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 Organization

NO 4
Acronym AGAGE
Name Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment Science Team(AGAGE)
Address 1 Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment
Address 2 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Global Change Science
Address 3 Building 54-1312 Cambridge, MA 02139-2307
Country/Territory Multinational
Website https://agage.mit.edu/

 Contact(s)

Name Ray Wang
Prefix Dr.
Email raywang@eas.gatech.edu
Organization No 121
Organization acronym EAS
Organization name School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology
Organization country/territory United States of America
Address 1
Address 2 311 Ferst Drive School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta
Address 3 GA 30332-0340, U.S.A
Country/territory United States of America
Tel (404)894-3815
Fax
Last updated date 2020-08-05


Name Ray F. Weiss
Prefix Prof.
Email rfweiss@ucsd.edu
Organization No 115
Organization acronym SIO
Organization name Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Organization country/territory United States of America
Address 1
Address 2 Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD
Address 3 La Jolla, CA 92093-0244 USA
Country/territory United States of America
Tel (858)534-2598
Fax
Last updated date 2020-07-27


 Monitoring background conditions, and the influence of air pollution
 UTC
 ppt
 9999-12-31 00:00:00 - 9999-12-31 23:59:59: SIO-98
 9999-12-31 00:00:00 - 9999-12-31 23:59:59: GC-MD(Unknown)
 event
 
 
 [Hourly]
 [Daily]
 [Monthly]
 AGAGE measurements which are suspected to be influenced by local or regional pollution events are marked with a 'P'.
 Valid: P
 Operational/Reporting
 
 Wind direction:
 Wind speed:
 Relative humidity:
 Precipitation amount:
 Air pressure:
 Air temperature:
 Dew point temperature:
 Sea water temperature:
 Sea surface water temperature:
 Sea water salinity:
 Sea surface water salinity:
Meteorological data may remain as first provded, even when greenhouse gas data are updated.
 
1  Prinn et al., A history of chemically and radiatively important gases in air deduced from ALE/GAGE/AGAGE, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 105, No. D14, p17,751-17,792, 2000.
2  Prinn, R. G., Weiss, R. F., Arduini, J., Arnold, T., DeWitt, H. L., Fraser, P. J., Ganesan, A. L., Gasore, J., Harth, C. M., Hermansen, O., Kim, J., Krummel, P. B., Li, S., Loh, Z. M., Lunder, C. R., Maione, M., Manning, A. J., Miller, B. R., Mitrevski, B., Muhle, J., O'Doherty, S., Park, S., Reimann, S., Rigby, M., Saito, T., Salameh, P. K., Schmidt, R., Simmonds, P. G., Steele, L. P., Vollmer, M. K., Wang, R. H., Yao, B., Yokouchi, Y., Young, D., and Zhou, L.: History of chemically and radiatively important atmospheric gases from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), Earth Syst. Sci. Data, 10, 985-1018, https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-985-2018, 2018.